Course Offerings for Fall 2017

OLS 510 Leadership & Management for the Common Good (3 SH)

Students will study contemporary and forecasted societal stresses—from community level to global—and learn of the critical role of organizations in both contributing toward, and helping to mitigate, these stresses broadly classified as ecological, social, and economic. Students will then learn a broad range of organizational leadership and management theories, styles, and practices to identify approaches to leading people, systems, and organizations in ways that bring restoration, that offer hope, and that work toward promoting the common good.

OLS 515 Introduction to Leadership Studies (3 SH)

The course is an overview of various leadership theories, examining models of leadership, philosophies of leadership and different leadership styles. The advantages and disadvantages of various approaches will be studied.

OLS 665 Project Management and Grant Writing (3 SH)

This course will cover the basics of grant writing and standard project management practice. From finding applicable granting organizations, proposal writing, and accurate estimating through the launch of a project, team building, implementation, QA, and delivery this course will focus on non-profit funding and project delivery. This course will focus primarily on traditional project management but will also offer an introduction to Agile methodology project management. Core goals and objectives: At the end of the class students should have a clear understanding of the common steps that go into a good grant process, be able to analyze and adapt their project to the grant criteria, know what a good grant proposal consists of, and have a better understanding of the organizations offering grants in their fields of work or study. Students should also be familiar with the standard PMI project breakdown structure,be able to understand and implement a project plan, be familiar with non-PMI project management processes and their associated benefits and pitfalls. Students should also be able to craft a project plan including everything from the initial charter to steps for proper closing of a project at the end of this course. Core requirements: At the conclusion of the grant writing portion of the course students will submit (to the instructor) a fully prepared grant application based on a real-life project and meeting the criteria of the organization of their choosing. As part of this requirement students will also provide the appropriate information from the granting organization as to the requirements of the grant. Presentation: Students will give a short presentation on the granting organization they chose, why they chose that organization, and a brief summary of their project. Analysis / Critique: Post presentation students will prepare an analysis and critique of their proposal and granting organization choice based on their work and the work of their classmates. Literature review: During the course of the class students will review a recent popular or literary work on Project Management of their choosing. This review will consist of a short summary of the book, a detailed analysis of the salient points, processes, and/or recommendations of the book. Not to exceed 5 pages. Project Plan: At the conclusion of the class students will submit a fully formed project plan covering every aspect of their approved project from project charter to project closing documents. Generally speaking these documents are no shorter than 20 pages, and can be considerably longer than that. Presentation: During the last full class period each student will be expected to present their project plan to the class. Presentations will likely be time-limited and as such will focus on knowledge of the material and delivery of the “elevator pitch” more than on the depth of plan presented. Online vs. traditional: The course is a blended on/off line course with built-in asynchronous activities to engage students in the material.

OLS 670 Project Management and Intrapreneurship (3 SH)

This course will cover the basics of standard project management practice with a focus on developing internal projects and programs. From the conceptualization of the idea, pitch, proposal through the launch of a project, team building, implementation, QA, and delivery, this course will cover the whole lifecycle of Intrapeneurship practices. This course will focus on traditional project management but will also offer an introduction to Agile methodology project management.
Core goals and objectives: At the end of this course students should have an excellent grasp of the process of developing a new project or division within a company, the risks associated with doing so, and the challenges associated with financing these endeavors. Students will also be familiar with the standard PMI project breakdown structure,be able to understand and implement a project plan, be familiar with non-PMI project management processes and their associated benefits and pitfalls. Students should also be able to craft a project plan including everything from the initial charter to steps for proper closing of a project at the end of this course. Core requirements: During the course students will submit a complete proposal pitching their idea, explaining the organizational fit and function, providing a cost estimate, proposing funding options, and listing a detailed risk analysis of the proposal. Presentation: During the intrapeneurship portion of the course students will pitch their ideas to the class / instructor as well as take questions on their proposals. Clarity, brevity, and quality of the pitch will be evaluated. Analysis / Critique: Following the presentation students will submit a short analysis and critique of their pitch based on what questions were posed, what techniques their peers presented, and their overall presentation style. Literature review: During the course of the class students will review a recent popular or literary work on Project Management of their choosing. This review will consist of a short summary of the book, a detailed analysis of the salient points, processes, and/or recommendations of the book. Not to exceed 5 pages. Project Plan: At the conclusion of the class students will submit a fully formed project plan covering every aspect of their approved project from project charter to project closing documents. Generally speaking these documents are no shorter than 20 pages, and can be considerably longer than that. Presentation: During the last full class period each student will be expected to present their project plan to the class. Presentations will likely be time-limited and as such will focus on knowledge of the material and delivery of the “elevator pitch” more than on the depth of plan presented.

MBA 675 Project Management (2 SH)

This course will cover the basics of standard project management practice. From the launch of a project, team building, implementation, QA, and delivery, project management as a field has become increasingly standardized in the past 20 years. However, within software and other technology intensive fields traditional “waterfall” project management has taken a back seat to “Agile” methods of project management. This course will focus on traditional project management but will also offer an introduction to Agile methodology project management.

Core goals and objectives: Project Management: At the completion of this course students should be familiar with the standard PMI project breakdown structure,be able to understand and implement a project plan, be familiar with non-PMI project management processes and their associated benefits and pitfalls. Students should also be able to craft a project plan including everything from the initial charter to steps for proper closing of a project at the end of this course.

Core requirements: Literature review: During the course of the class students will review a recent popular or literary work on Project Management of their choosing. This review will consist of a short summary of the book, a detailed analysis of the salient points, processes, and/or recommendations of the book. Not to exceed 5 pages.

Project Plan: At the conclusion of the class students will submit a fully formed project plan covering every aspect of their approved project from project charter to project closing documents. Generally speaking these documents are no shorter than 20 pages, and can be considerably longer than that.

Presentation: During the last full class period each student will be expected to present their project plan to the class. Presentations will likely be time-limited and as such will focus on knowledge of the material and delivery of the “elevator pitch” more than on the depth of plan presented.
MBA 685 Grant Writing (1 SH)

This course will cover the basics of professional level grant writing for for-profit and non-profit applications both intra and extra-organizational. Covering topics from polishing your idea, organizational / application fit, guideline analysis, background research, and crafting the perfect application in an imperfect system.

Core goals and objectives: Grant Writing: At the end of the class students should have a clear understanding of the common steps that go into a good grant process, be able to analyze and adapt their project to the grant criteria, know what a good grant proposal consists of, and have a better understanding of the organizations offering grants in their fields of work or study.

Core requirements: Grant application: At the conclusion of the course students will submit (to the instructor) a fully prepared grant application based on a real-life project and meeting the criteria of the organization of their choosing. As part of this requirement students will also provide the appropriate information from the granting organization as to the requirements of the grant.

Presentation: During the last class period students will give a short presentation on the granting organization they chose, why they chose that organization, and a brief summary of their project.

Analysis / Critique: Post presentation students will prepare an analysis and critique of their proposal and granting organization choice based on their work and the work of their classmates.

MBA 690 Intrapreneurship (1 SH)

This course will cover the concept of intrepeneurship within good business practice. Focusing on developing and idea, pitching it, funding it, and communicating with stakeholders as the project progresses. The course will allow students to explore the concepts around the ideation, innovation, implementation of new ideas in the business setting.

Core goals and objectives: Intrepreneurship: At the end of this course students should have an excellent grasp of the process of developing a new project or division within a company, the risks associated with doing so, and the challenges associated with financing these endeavors.

Core requirements: Intrapeneurship proposal: At the conclusion of the course students will submit a complete proposal pitching their idea, explaining the organizational fit and function, providing a cost estimate, proposing funding options, and listing a detailed risk analysis of the proposal.

Presentation: During the last session of the course students will pitch their ideas to the class / instructor as well as take questions on their proposals. Clarity, brevity, and quality of the pitch will be evaluated.

Analysis / Critique: Following the presentation students will submit a short analysis and critique of their pitch based on what questions were posed, what techniques their peers presented, and their overall presentation style.

Full list of courses and descriptions

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