Ryan Good

Ryan Good

Office Phone: (202) 529-5378

Email:

Washington Comm Scholars

Office Location: n/a

Ryan M. Good is an assistant professor of applied social sciences and assistant director of the Washington Community Scholars Center. He holds a PhD in Planning and Public Policy from Rutgers University, an MA in Geography and Urban Studies from Temple University, and an MA in Theological Studies from Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary. His research and teaching have covered:

- Community development theory and practice
- Place-based organizing and organizations
- Neighborhood identity and politics
- Public schools
- Urban political theory
- Theories and politics of urban space
- Research methods

In his doctoral research, Ryan studied community responses to school closures in Philadelphia, exploring the ways neighborhood stakeholders invoked place and place identity in protesting and making sense of the closure of local public schools. This work fits within a larger research agenda focused on the politics of place, claims to space, and the contestation of spatialized inequalities.

Education

Ph.D., Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University, 2017
M.A., Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University, 2011
M.A., Theological Studies, Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary, 2006
B.A., Physics, Goshen College, 2000

Publications

Refereed Journal Articles

Teresa, B. F., & Good, R. M. (2017) “Speculative charter growth in the case of UNO in Chicago.” Urban Affairs Review. doi: 10.1177/1078087417703487

Good, R. M. (2016) “Histories that root us: Neighborhood, place, and the protest of school closures in Philadelphia.” Urban Geography. doi: 10.1080/02723638.2016.1182286

Good, R. M. (2016) “Invoking landscapes of spatialized inequality: Race, class, and place in Philadelphia’s school closure debate.” Journal of Urban Affairs. doi: 10.1080/07352166.2016.1245069

Non-Refereed Journal Articles

Good, R. M., Rivero, J. J., & Zitcer, A. (2017) “Confronting the challenge of humanist planning.” Planning Theory & Practice. doi: 10.1080/14649357.2017.1297554