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Daniel Showalter

DEPARTMENT: Mathematical Sciences Dept

POSITION: Assist. Professor Mathematics

LOCATION: Main Campus, Harrisonburg | AN 104

PHONE: (540) 432-4430

EMAIL: daniel.showalter@emu.edu

Daniel Showalter received a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics from Urbana University, an M.S. in Mathematics from Ohio University, and a Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from Ohio University. At EMU, Daniel teaches mathematics, statistics, and computer science courses. His research interests include rural mathematics education, East Asian mathematics, data visualization, and causal inference on quasiexperimental data. He enjoys coffee conversations, math puzzles, anything multicultural, and dancing with his two little girls.

Education

  • B.S. in Mathematics, Urbana University, 2001.
  • M.S. in Mathematics, post-secondary education track, Ohio University, 2011.
  • Ph.D. in Mathematics Education, Ohio University, 2014. Ph.D. advisor: Bob Klein. Title: The causal effect of high school mathematics coursetaking on placement out of postsecondary remedial mathematics.

Publications

  • Showalter, D. A. (2017). To math or not to math: The algebra-calculus pipeline and postsecondary mathematics remediation. Journal of Experimental Education, doi: 10.1080/00220973.2017.1299080.
  • Foley, G. D., Butts, T. R., Phelps, S. W., & Showalter, D. A. (2017). Advanced quantitative reasoning: Mathematics for the world around us, Revised Edition. Austin, TX: AQR Press.
  • Showalter, D., Klein, R., Johnson, J., & Hartman, S.L. (2017). Why rural matters 2015–16: Understanding the changing landscape [Online report]. Arlington, VA: Rural School and Community Trust. Available from www.ruraledu.org
  • Christophel, J., & Showalter, D. (In Press). Color coding. EBSCO research starters. [Online encyclopedia article]. Birmingham, AL: EBSCO Science Reference Center.
  • Chupp, B., Huff, A., & Showalter, D. (In Press). Sampling vs. census. EBSCO research starters. [Online encyclopedia article]. Birmingham, AL: EBSCO Science Reference Center.
  • Miller, J., & Showalter, D. (In Press). String-oriented symbolic language. EBSCO research starters. [Online encyclopedia article]. Birmingham, AL: EBSCO Science Reference Center.
  • Showalter, D. & Howley, C. (2016). Mathematics instruction for paraprofessionals [Set of 12 modules]. Dayton, OH: Ohio Partnership for Excellence in Paraprofessional Preparation.
  • Foley, G. D., Butts, T. R., Phelps, S. W., & Showalter, D. A. (2015). Advanced quantitative reasoning: Mathematics for the world around us, Texas Edition. Austin, TX: AQR Press.
  • Showalter, D. A. (2015). The game that does it all [Back Page: Favorite Lesson, April Issue]. Mathematics Teacher. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
  • Howley, C., Howley, A., & Showalter, D. (2015). Leaving or staying home: Belief systems and paradigms in rural education. In T. Stambaugh & S. Wood (Eds.), Best practices for serving gifted students in rural settings. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
  • Johnson, J., Showalter, D., Klein, R., & Lester, C. (2014). Why rural matters 2013–14: The condition of rural education in the 50 states [Online report]. Arlington, VA: Rural School and Community Trust. Available from www.ruraledu.org
  • Showalter, D. A., Wollett, C., & Reynolds, S. (2014). Teaching a high-level contextualized mathematics curriculum to adult basic learners. Journal of Research and Practice for Adult Literacy, Secondary, and Basic Education, _3_(2), 21–34.
  • Showalter, D. A. (2013). Place-based mathematics: A conflated pedagogy? Journal of Research in Rural Education, _28_(6), 1–13. Retrieved from http://jrre.psu.edu/articles/28-6.
  • Howley, C., Showalter, D., Klein, R., Sturgill, D., & Smith, M. (2013). Rural math talent, now and then. Roeper Review, 35, 102–114.
  • Howley, A., Showalter, D., Howley, M. D., Howley, C. B., Klein, R., & Johnson, J. (2011). Challenges for place-based mathematics pedagogy in rural schools and communities in the United States. Children, Youth and Environments, _21_(1), 101–127.

Scholarly Presentations and Abstracts

  • Showalter, D., Klein, R., Johnson, J., & Hartman, S.L. (2017, Apr.). Capitol Hill briefing on Why Rural Matters 2015–16. Presented in a Senate meeting room of the Capitol building, Washington, DC.
  • Showalter, D. (2017, Jan.). Rural education in Florida: Then and now. Inaugural speaker for the Institute for the Advancement of Research, Innovation, and Practice in Rural Education: University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL.
  • Showalter, D. (2016, Aug.). Measuring college readiness. Webinar presented to the Mid-Atlantic Regional Educational Lab’s Rural Student College Readiness Research Alliance.
  • Showalter, D. (2016, July). Postsecondary readiness in rural schools. Presented at a Cross-RELs conference held on postsecondary readiness. Nashville, TN.
  • Showalter, D. (2015, Jan.). Do high school mathematics courses prepare students for college placement tests? Presented at the annual Joint Mathematical Meetings, San Antonio, TX.
  • Showalter, D., & Sturgill, D. (2014, Oct.). Advanced quantitative reasoning: Mathematics for informed citizenship. Presented at the annual meeting of the National Network for Educational Renewal, Cincinnati, OH.
  • Showalter, D., & Klein, R. (2014, Sept.). Myths and omissions in rural STEM education. Keynote speech at the annual Appalachian Ohio Mathematics and Science Teaching Research Symposium, Ohio University, Athens, OH.
  • Showalter, D. (2014, Sept.). The current state of rural education across the nation. Webinar presented to i3 (Investing in Innovation fund) grantees, hosted by the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Showalter, D., & Klein, R. (2014, July). Capitol Hill briefing on Why Rural Matters 2013–14. Presented in a Senate meeting room of the Capitol building, Washington, DC.
  • Showalter, D., Hernandez, S., Richard, A., & Kennedy Manzo, K. (2014, May). Rural reporting: Another country? Presented at the 67th national seminar of the Education Writers Association, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.