Jess Kraybill

Jess Kraybill

Office Phone: (540) 432-4431

Email:

Main Campus, Harrisonburg

Office Location: RLN 311

Assistant Professor

Psychology Dept and MA in Biomedicine

Jess is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at EMU and also serves as faculty for the MA in Biomedicine program. Her research centers around executive function abilities. Executive function (EF) refers to higher order cognitive abilities necessary to consciously persist in a task or behavior despite facing challenges in the form of competing rules, distractions, or delays. A significant body of work has documented the relation between EF deficits and early child development. Low levels of EF are associated with clinical-level ADHD symptamotology (Gewirtz, Stanton-Chapman & Reeve, 2009), social difficulties (Fahie & Symons, 2003), academic difficulties (Zhou, Main, & Wang, 2010), and difficulty regulating emotions (Kochanska, Murray, & Harlan, 2000). Jess’ research focuses on understanding the nature of EF and the factors associated with optimal regulatory abilities through a longitudinal, latent analysis framework. Her 2013 paper in Developmental Psychobiology (‘Infancy predictors of preschool and post-kindergarten executive function’) is one of their top 10 most downloaded articles and was a finalist for the 2013-2014 Hennessy-Smotherman-Wiley Best Student Paper Award.

Jess is an avid runner and dog lover. If you frequent downtown Harrisonburg regularly, you’ll probably see her running with her dog Jake at some point.

Education

PhD in Psychology
Virginia Tech

MS in Psychology
Virginia Tech

BA in Psychology
Earlham College

Publications

Peer-reviewed Journal Articles

Kraybill, J.H., & Bell, M.A. (2013). Infancy predictors of preschool and post-kindergarten executive function. Developmental Psychobiology, 55, 530-538.
*Nominated for the Hennessy-Smotherman-Wiley Best Student Paper Award
*One of Developmental Psychobiology’s top 10 most downloaded papers

Chapters in Edited Books

Bell, M.A., Kraybill, J. H., & Diaz, A. (2014). Reactivity, regulation, and remembering: Associations between temperament and memory. In P.J. Bauer & R. Fivush (Eds.), Handbook on the development of children’s memory (pp. 671-687). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Scholarly Presentations and Abstracts

Peer-reviewed Symposia Papers at Scientific Meetings

Bell, M .A., & Kraybill, J.H. (2013, April). Using the EEG to examine the neurological foundations of early developing executive function skills. In A. Tarullo & W. Fifer (Chairs), From brain to behavior: Linking infant EEG measures to neurobehavioral development. Symposium paper presented at Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle.

Bell, M.A., Diaz, A., & Kraybill, J.H. (2012, June). Psychophysiological indicators of stress regulation during infancy. In M. Sullivan (Chair), Using psychophysiological measures to understand emotion and emotion regulation in infancy. Symposium paper presented at International Conference on Infancy Studies, Minneapolis.

Peer-reviewed Poster Presentations at Scientific Meetings

Bell, M.A., Diaz, A., Kraybill, J.H., Marcovitch, S., & Calkins, S.D. (2012, June). Functional connectivity and top-down regulation of threat during infancy. Poster presented at International Conference on Infant Studies, Minneapolis.

Reyes, N., Kraybill, J., Choi, J., & Bell, M.A. (2012, May). I can help you and I can empathize with you: The role of temperament in prosocial behaviors in 3 year olds. Poster presented at Association for Psychological Science, Chicago.

Kraybill, J.H., & Bell, M.A. (2011, November). Hot and cool executive function at ages 2 and 3. Poster presented at International Society for Developmental Psychobiology, Washington DC.

Kraybill, J., Wolfe, C.D., Morasch, K.C., Hubble, M., & Bell, M.A. (2011, April). Early parent-child interactions and later executive function skills. Poster presented at Society for Research in Child Development, Montreal.

Kraybill, J., Hubble, M., & Bell, M.A. (2010, October). Maternal behavior in infancy as a predictor of effortful control in kindergarten. Poster presented at the Occasional Temperament Conference, Brunswick, ME.

Kraybill, J., Cardell, A.M., Morasch, K.C., & Bell, M.A. (2010, March). Temperament
correlations with abstract and motivationally significant executive functions from infancy
through early childhood.
Poster presented at International Conference on Infant Studies, Baltimore.

Kraybill, J., Hubble, M., & Bell, M.A. (2010, October). Maternal behavior in infancy as a predictor of effortful control in kindergarten. Poster presented at the Occasional Temperament Conference, Brunswick, ME.